FAI: I didn’t know

“I didn’t know you were in pain.”

 I did not know either. 

I know that seems like an improbable statement but it’s true. 

First of all, I’ve been this way for so long that I didn’t know that it wasn’t normal.  I have it in my head that because my FAI is in both hips that there must be a genetic influence. It’s not like one day I went skiing and blew out my hip as I failed to performed a radical trick. I cannot pinpoint a day zero as to when the pain started.  So, either I grew up this way or the condition came on so gradual that the change from day to day was undetectable.  As you might recall from my last post, my original treatment goal had been to recover from chronic achillies tendonitis not to find out why I don’t like to sit down. 

Second, I would describe most of my pain as more like an ache than a pain. I rarely take anything for pain management. I’m almost always just uncomfortable.  I assume it’s similar to how most people feel  feel after a very long car trip, only I feel that way immediately when I sit down. 

I feel pretty lucky.  Many of the FAI blogs and members of FAI groups are in terrible pain and need prescriptions to alleviate their pain.  Because I’m not in that state, there are many days when I question if I really need this surgery. I am often told, however, that the labrum cannot repair itself. If I don’t have it fixed now, I’ll have full hip joint replacement down the road when I can’t take any more pain. That doesn’t sound like a very good option to me.  

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3 Comments

Filed under Arthroscopic surgery, FAI, Femoroacetabular Impingement, Hip Impingement, injury, Uncategorized

3 responses to “FAI: I didn’t know

  1. Hello,
    saw your post, questioning if you need the surgery or not. I had the surgery twice, once on each hip. The recovery is very long indeed but it can give you your life back. It did for me.

    Keep in mind when you read posts online in groups, specialized in this, that most of them are support groups and people who are not doing well are hanging out there – looking for support.
    The folks that had the surgery and are doing well are not in the groups anymore. They have moved on, living their lifes.

    Don’t be scared of the surgery. It is doable. It takes time, patience, dedication and a whole lot of love but one can do it.
    Best of luck with your decision.

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